Wednesday, July 4, 2012

New Interesting and cool Facts about Apples

Facts about apple:

  1. The average person eats 65 apples per year.
  2. Apples float because 25% of their volume is air.
  3. The largest apple ever picked weighed three pounds, two ounces.
  4. One medium apple contains about 80 calories.
  5. The word apple comes from the Old English aeppel.
  6. The Celtic word for apple is abhall.
  7. Quercetin is found only in the apple skin. The skin also contains more antioxidants and fibre than the flesh.
  8. China produces more apples than any other country.
  9. Washington, New York, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and California are the top 5 apple-producing states in the U.S. In all, 36 states produce apples commercially.
  10. The apple is the official state fruit of Washington, New York, Rhode Island, and West Virginia.
  11. There are more than 7500 varieties of apples grown in the world. About 2500 varieties are grown in the United States.
  12. Red Delicious is the most popular and most-produced apple in the United States. Golden Delicious is the second most popular.
  13. The only apple native to North America is the crabapple.
  14. Half the United States apple crop is turned into apple products like applesauce and apple juice.
  15. Apple trees don't bear their first fruit until they are four or five years old.
  16. Archaeologists have evidence of people eating apples as far back as 6500 B.C.
  17. The more apples a person eats, the lower his or her risk of developing lung cancer.
  18. Johnny Appleseed was the nickname for John Chapman, a kind and generous American pioneer born in 1774 who planted apple seeds in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois.
  19. Contrary to popular belief, there is no mention of an apple as the forbidden fruit in the Bible. It is referred to as "fruit from the Tree of Knowledge" with no specification as to which kind of fruit. It was Hugo Van Der Goes who first implicated the apple as the forbidden fruit in his 1470 A.D. painting, The Fall of Man. After that, it became popular to depict the apple as the forbidden fruit.
  20. The Adam's apple is so-called because of a popular idea that it was created when the forbidden fruit got stuck in Adam's throat when he swallowed it.
  21. Apples are a member of the rose family.
  22. Archaeologists have found evidence that humans have been enjoying apples since at least 6500 B.C.
  23. The apple tree originated in an area between the Caspian and the Black Sea.
  24. Apple varieties range in size from a little larger than a cherry to as large as a grapefruit. There are apples that have an aftertaste of pears, citrus, cinnamon, cloves, coconut, strawberries, grapes and even pineapple!
  25. Planting an apple seed from a particular apple will not produce a tree of that same variety. The seed is a cross of the tree the fruit was grown on and the variety that was the cross pollinator.
  26. Apples have five seed pockets or carpels. Each pocket contains seeds. The number of seeds per carpel is determined by the vigour and health of the plant. Different varieties of apples will have different number of seeds.
  27. It takes energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.
  28. Fresh apples float because 25% of their volume is air (thank goodness, or none of us would have ever experienced bobbing for apples!).
  29. Apples ripen six to ten times faster at room temperature than if they were refrigerated. For optimal storage, apples should be kept at 35-40 degrees with relative humidity of 80-90%.
  30. A bushel of apples weighs approximately 42 pounds, or 19kg. A peck of apples weighs 10.5 pounds, or 4.8kg.
  31. The average U.S. consumer eats an estimated 45 pounds of apples a year. Europeans consumers eat 46 pounds a year.
  32. Sixty percent of the 2002 U.S. apple crop was eaten as fresh fruit, while 39 percent was processed into apple products, and 1 percent was not marketed. Of the 39 percent of the crop that was processed, 18 percent was used in juice and cider; 3 percent was dried; 2 percent was frozen; and 12 percent was canned. Other uses include the making of baby food, apple butter or jelly, and vinegar.
  33. The apple is the official state fruit of Rhode Island, New York, Washington, and West Virginia. The apple blossom (Pyrus coronaria) is the official state flower of Arkansas and Michigan.
  34. The old saying "an apple a day, keeps the doctor away" comes from an old English adage, "To eat an apple before going to bed, will make the doctor beg his bread."
  35. Apples are a member of the rose family.
  36. Archeologists have found evidence that humans have been enjoying apples since at least 6500 B.C.
  37. The apple tree originated in an area between the Caspian and the Black Sea.
  38. Apple varieties range in size from a little larger than a cherry to as large as a grapefruit. There are apples that have an aftertaste of pears, citrus, cinnamon, cloves, coconut, strawberries, grapes and even pineapple!
  39. Planting an apple seed from a particular apple will not produce a tree of that same variety. The seed is a cross of the tree the fruit was grown on and the variety that was the cross pollinator.
  40. Apples have five seed pockets or carpels. Each pocket contains seeds. The number of seeds per carpel is determined by the vigor and health of the plant. Different varieties of apples will have different number of seeds.
  41. It takes energy from 50 leaves to produce one apple.
  42. Fresh apples float because 25% of their volume is air (thank goodness, or none of us would have ever experienced bobbing for apples!).
  43. Apples ripen six to ten times faster at room temperature than if they were refrigerated. For optimal storage, apples should be kept at 35-40 degrees with relative humidity of 80-90%.
  44. A bushel of apples weighs approximately 42 pounds, or 19kg. A peck of apples weighs 10.5 pounds, or 4.8kg.
  45. The average U.S. consumer eats an estimated 45 pounds of apples a year. Europeans consumers eat 46 pounds a year.
  46. Sixty percent of the 2002 U.S. apple crop was eaten as fresh fruit, while 39 percent was processed into apple products, and 1 percent was not marketed. Of the 39 percent of the crop that was processed, 18 percent was used in juice and cider; 3 percent was dried; 2 percent was frozen; and 12 percent was canned. Other uses include the making of baby food, apple butter or jelly, and vinegar.
  47. The apple is the official state fruit of Rhode Island, New York, Washington, and West Virginia. The apple blossom (Pyrus coronaria) is the official state flower of Arkansas and Michigan.
  48. The old saying "an apple a day, keeps the doctor away" comes from am old English adage, "To eat an apple before going to bed, will make the doctor beg his bread."
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